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    Genealogy - Would you submit DNA to trace your roots?

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    Grits

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    Genealogy - Would you submit DNA to trace your roots?

    Post  Grits on Wed 24 Feb 2010, 1:09 am

    I really want to do this, but have a few worries about my DNA being scattered about... Suspect

    Here is a website where you can read about this process and maybe even find some info if your family is one listed (look under "Surname Projects" to see if one has been started for your family):

    http://www.worldfamilies.net/

    It's quite expensive (by my standards) but I find this fascinating!

    There is quite a history on my paternal side of the family listed there and it lists some of the same info I have researched before and basically traces that line all the back to rumors of being of the Tribe of Dan (okay not my first choice of the tribes to belong to... Neutral ), but interesting nonetheless.

    Here's my paternal lineage link so you can see how it works.

    http://www.worldfamilies.net/surnames/nolan/

    Anyway, was wondering how fellow genealogy fans feel about doing the DNA thing? Would you do it?

    scratch
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    Polly, AZ

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    Grits

    Post  Polly, AZ on Wed 24 Feb 2010, 7:47 am

    Grits wrote:I really want to do this, but have a few worries about my DNA being scattered about... Suspect

    Here is a website where you can read about this process and maybe even find some info if your family is one listed (look under "Surname Projects" to see if one has been started for your family):

    http://www.worldfamilies.net/

    It's quite expensive (by my standards) but I find this fascinating!

    There is quite a history on my paternal side of the family listed there and it lists some of the same info I have researched before and basically traces that line all the back to rumors of being of the Tribe of Dan (okay not my first choice of the tribes to belong to... Neutral ), but interesting nonetheless.

    Here's my paternal lineage link so you can see how it works.

    http://www.worldfamilies.net/surnames/nolan/

    Anyway, was wondering how fellow genealogy fans feel about doing the DNA thing? Would you do it?

    scratch

    Grit - my vote on it is NO ! Your DNA is personal and should be kept that way. Would you give a stranger your credit card number and the PIN? Think twice please.
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    Bill Silver Eagle

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    Would I or wouldn't I ?

    Post  Bill Silver Eagle on Wed 24 Feb 2010, 2:38 pm

    That's a good question ... from various sources I've researched the cost is anywhere from about #364.00 to well over $1,000.00.

    The problem I've come across with geneology research, is the record keeping and spelling of the early census takers. I've been able to only take my father's side of the family back to my grandfather and great-grandmother, because they immigrated around the turn of the 1900's. My mother's side I've been able to go back to the 1830's before records disappear, as well as that it was my 3rd great-grandmother on my maternal grandmother's father's side of the family that were Indian. In the 1830's in the Indiana, Ohio and Michigan areas many of the indigenous peoples intermarried with the westward encroaching whites. So they became "white" or "mulatto" during those censuses. Not to mention in many states it was illegal up until the 1950's for an Indian to own land.

    So is it worth it for me ... maybe if there can be quanitifiable proof of blood lines, but were taking almost five generations of intermixing of genes and DNA.

    I have been lucky to trace portions of my wife's tree back 15 generations to her 11th great grandmother in England in the mid 1500's.
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    Lar

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    Re: Genealogy - Would you submit DNA to trace your roots?

    Post  Lar on Wed 24 Feb 2010, 3:32 pm

    I would love to be able to trace back my roots using my DNA. BUT there is no way I would ever put my DNA out there on any data base, out of fear of it being used against me in any way.

    Using the old way, I do know my paternal roots on both my mother and fathers side of the family. Immigrating to Canada from Ireland Scotland France Germany and the English via the USA, Loyalists that fled the USA for Canada. The records show most of my ancestors came here in the earl 1800's and even back further (exact dates unknown) when examining the French ancestry. Races encompass Native Indian, Black and White. God knows what else is running through my veins.
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    Nightmoves

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    Re: Genealogy - Would you submit DNA to trace your roots?

    Post  Nightmoves on Wed 24 Feb 2010, 4:42 pm

    I am wondering how this could be done scratch As there are no samples of DNA from those who have passed from years ago, how can they check it??? Another question, wouldn't they only be able to check it to others that have contributed DNA? scratch Unless every one's DNA is in some bank somewhere, then they really don't need it, because they already have it. I just don't get it. scratch I think it would wind up inconclusive too often. Suspect Just my 2 cents. drunken

    Kelli Marie

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    Absolutely yes!

    Post  Kelli Marie on Wed 24 Feb 2010, 8:56 pm

    Our lines are so convoluted that a DNA analysis would definitely shed light on our ancestry. My brothers and I have been discussing this. We will split the cost. (The more siblings you have the more you can spread the cost around.)

    One line in our pedigree has been doing this for a couple of years to confirm which branches of Bozemans intersect with which branches of other related lines.

    No hesitation here. I'm not one of those who see big brother behind every tree.

    Kelli Marie

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    Hunting dead ancestors in the USA

    Post  Kelli Marie on Wed 24 Feb 2010, 9:35 pm

    Bill Silver Eagle wrote:That's a good question ... from various sources I've researched the cost is anywhere from about #364.00 to well over $1,000.00.

    The problem I've come across with geneology research, is the record keeping and spelling of the early census takers. I've been able to only take my father's side of the family back to my grandfather and great-grandmother, because they immigrated around the turn of the 1900's. My mother's side I've been able to go back to the 1830's before records disappear, as well as that it was my 3rd great-grandmother on my maternal grandmother's father's side of the family that were Indian. In the 1830's in the Indiana, Ohio and Michigan areas many of the indigenous peoples intermarried with the westward encroaching whites. So they became "white" or "mulatto" during those censuses. Not to mention in many states it was illegal up until the 1950's for an Indian to own land.

    So is it worth it for me ... maybe if there can be quanitifiable proof of blood lines, but were taking almost five generations of intermixing of genes and DNA.

    I have been lucky to trace portions of my wife's tree back 15 generations to her 11th great grandmother in England in the mid 1500's.

    I empathize with your frustration in hunting ancestors with native blood. The most difficult period through which to research and document in the U.S. is the period from the Revolution to the Civil War, especially if your ancestors were moving west on the cusp of civilization. (If a blood line stayed snuggled up to the Atlantic Coast it's a lot easier, except in southern states where most of the courthouses and the records they contained were burned to the ground during the Civil War.)

    As you know, the U.S. census did not list everyone by name until 1850. Before that, except for the head of household, there were just tick marks. There are few records of marriage between individuals of different races. Indeed, some folks kept moving west to stay ahead of the dumb moral codes of the more "civilized" areas. Oftimes a tip is that there is no record of the marriage. One of my five-great grandfathers had two "wives." The first marriage was recorded and resulted in nine children. Then Keziah, the wife, died. But in Micajah's will he lists 16 children, all of which he treats equally. Then, by chance, I found a document filed in a North Carolina county, which Micajah and Susannah York, a "free mulatto," pledge to treat one another as wife to husband and husband to wife. Micajah also pledges to buy the freedom of a child of Susannah's from another relationship.

    One of my great grandfathers, born in McMinn County, TN, in 1860, always told his grandchildren that he was the "blood brother of a Cherokee chief." I haven't proven it yet, but I suspect that his grandfather and possibly his father married women of mixed blood. His brothers and first cousins did leave Tennessee, some for Texas, some for Missouri.

    And then there's my two great grandfather born in Texas in 1845 in the part of the soon-to-be-state in which part of the Western Cherokee had settled. I also suspect that he or his big brother (probaby the latter) served under Stand Watie, at least as far into the War as the Battle of Pea Ridge. I have the date but there is no record of the marriage of my great great grandfather in 1863 in Texas, LA, Arkansas, OK or MO. Very odd.

    As you know, after the Treaty of Hopewell in 1785, a significant number of Cherokee read the writing on the wall and headed out to MIssouri, which was just opening up for Americans at the invitation of the Spanish. (A specific invitee was Daniel Boone who was not known for his love of native Americans.) Anyway, after the New Madrid quakes of 1811-1812 the Western Cherokee figured that mother earth didn't want them in Missouri and most moved down to Arkansas or east Texas. Tracing and documenting connections of intermarriage with these people is really tough.

    Sometimes French or Spanish colonial records or Mexican records can be of help. The Spanish and Mexicans insisted that immigrants pledge fealty to the Pope as well as civilian government, but had no reservations about allowing people of different races to marry. (In fact, part of the reason the Texans rebeled was that Mexico did not permit slavery.)

    When land records don't help, tax records might. Court records can be gems, especially if the books are indexed. Some states have school census records, which usually list the children studying and who their parent or guardiwn is. Sometimes church records of early congregations can help. For example, many of the families in our lines in Kentucky and Tennessee were Baptists. The Baptists have a couple of history libraries (I've been to Knoxville and Lexington) and also have a great website. Google "Baptist history."

    There is also a site called "Books We Own," BWO. Researchers who own copies of all kinds of research materials volunteer to look up relatives for others. Might be worth skimming through the states in which you are interested.

    I haven't given up trying to document our First People roots. You can't either.

    A genealogist friend once told me, "They want to be found."

    They want to be found.

    Hugs,
    KM

    Kelli Marie

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    place of origin

    Post  Kelli Marie on Wed 24 Feb 2010, 9:41 pm

    Nightmoves wrote:I am wondering how this could be done scratch As there are no samples of DNA from those who have passed from years ago, how can they check it??? Another question, wouldn't they only be able to check it to others that have contributed DNA? scratch Unless every one's DNA is in some bank somewhere, then they really don't need it, because they already have it. I just don't get it. scratch I think it would wind up inconclusive too often. Suspect Just my 2 cents. drunken


    As I understand it, the DNA examination can't tell you from which specific individuals you are descended and isn't intended to. Anthropology has advanced to the point where study of DNA can determine where your ancestors came from and about what time a particular blood line was infused into what you have inherited.

    It's kind of like when dog owners have their mutts tested to see what breeds they have in their background.
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    Polly, AZ

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    Bill Silver Eagle - genealogy

    Post  Polly, AZ on Wed 24 Feb 2010, 9:56 pm

    Bill Silver Eagle wrote:That's a good question ... from various sources I've researched the cost is anywhere from about #364.00 to well over $1,000.00.

    The problem I've come across with geneology research, is the record keeping and spelling of the early census takers. I've been able to only take my father's side of the family back to my grandfather and great-grandmother, because they immigrated around the turn of the 1900's. My mother's side I've been able to go back to the 1830's before records disappear, as well as that it was my 3rd great-grandmother on my maternal grandmother's father's side of the family that were Indian. In the 1830's in the Indiana, Ohio and Michigan areas many of the indigenous peoples intermarried with the westward encroaching whites. So they became "white" or "mulatto" during those censuses. Not to mention in many states it was illegal up until the 1950's for an Indian to own land.

    So is it worth it for me ... maybe if there can be quanitifiable proof of blood lines, but were taking almost five generations of intermixing of genes and DNA.

    I have been lucky to trace portions of my wife's tree back 15 generations to her 11th great grandmother in England in the mid 1500's.

    I sure know what you are talking about Bill when you talk about researching Native American genealogy. I have searched my genealogy for 35 years - long before computers came along. I did my search in the same areas that you did, Ohio, Michigan, Indiana and into Canada back to 1760. The French fur trappers would live common law with an Indian woman, have a child or two and then (to be proper) he would marry a French girl in the church and the Mother of the children was tossed aside. I have seen plenty of birth records in the 1700/1800 hundreds where the Indian Mother was only listed as "Ottawa Sqaw", or whatever clan she belonged too. I would get SO mad everytime i saw that. Although I hate doing genealogy on the net, they now do have Native American organizations who have old records that you might be able to get some help from. In my case, the fur trader had a child by a Canadian indian woman and brought her to Michigan territory and then dumped her there to marry a French girl. It took me a long time to track her clan down in Canada, but i did find a single name for her and the clan. Also keep in mind that in the 1800s most Indian children were taken away from their families to be raised in Catholic schools. Their Indian names stripped from then and given "proper names" Mad and beaten if they spoke their original language. So much for the kindnessof the church. I wish you luck in your search Bill, but even if you don't find her in books, she is still "part of you".
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    Polly, AZ

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    Lar - genealogy

    Post  Polly, AZ on Wed 24 Feb 2010, 10:07 pm

    Lar wrote:I would love to be able to trace back my roots using my DNA. BUT there is no way I would ever put my DNA out there on any data base, out of fear of it being used against me in any way.

    Using the old way, I do know my paternal roots on both my mother and fathers side of the family. Immigrating to Canada from Ireland Scotland France Germany and the English via the USA, Loyalists that fled the USA for Canada. The records show most of my ancestors came here in the earl 1800's and even back further (exact dates unknown) when examining the French ancestry. Races encompass Native Indian, Black and White. God knows what else is running through my veins.

    Your family roots follow much of mine, except that mine came in the late 1600s/1700s. The french Catholics kept wonderful records (as long as they were never lost in fire). If you can find a record in a USA Catholic church and take the name & dates to Canadian catholic records you can many times track that line back into Europe to the early 1500s. Most of us with family in this country back into the 1700/1800s could be called (in dog language) MUTTS Shocked , but we sure are a hardy breed! Happy Hunting!!
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    Nightmoves

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    Re: Genealogy - Would you submit DNA to trace your roots?

    Post  Nightmoves on Wed 24 Feb 2010, 10:07 pm

    Kelli Marie wrote:
    Nightmoves wrote:I am wondering how this could be done scratch As there are no samples of DNA from those who have passed from years ago, how can they check it??? Another question, wouldn't they only be able to check it to others that have contributed DNA? scratch Unless every one's DNA is in some bank somewhere, then they really don't need it, because they already have it. I just don't get it. scratch I think it would wind up inconclusive too often. Suspect Just my 2 cents. drunken


    As I understand it, the DNA examination can't tell you from which specific individuals you are descended and isn't intended to. Anthropology has advanced to the point where study of DNA can determine where your ancestors came from and about what time a particular blood line was infused into what you have inherited.

    It's kind of like when dog owners have their mutts tested to see what breeds they have in their background.

    I paid a lot of money once to have a family tree book done. Boy was that a joke. It was based on your last name. Ours came back page after page, inconclusive, no information found, etc. etc. What a waste of money it was.

    I would be hesitant to do it with DNA. I basically know where my ancestors are from and that is good enough for me. I don't need to know if I'm related to the queen queen or King king or even to Tut farao . I guess being related to Santa Claus would be nice santa . Finally I got to use these smileys. cheers

    lol!
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    Polly, AZ

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    Nightmoves - genealogy

    Post  Polly, AZ on Wed 24 Feb 2010, 10:12 pm

    Nightmoves wrote:I am wondering how this could be done scratch As there are no samples of DNA from those who have passed from years ago, how can they check it??? Another question, wouldn't they only be able to check it to others that have contributed DNA? scratch Unless every one's DNA is in some bank somewhere, then they really don't need it, because they already have it. I just don't get it. scratch I think it would wind up inconclusive too often. Suspect Just my 2 cents. drunken

    That's exactly right Nightmoves, they can't trace it back to an exact ancestor and it's a trap in many cases. There are certain organizations trying to track down descendants of certain blood lines and this is how they bait them. They can only tell someone what part of the world their ancestors came from, which most of them know already.
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    Nightmoves

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    Re: Genealogy - Would you submit DNA to trace your roots?

    Post  Nightmoves on Wed 24 Feb 2010, 10:22 pm

    Polly, AZ wrote:
    Nightmoves wrote:I am wondering how this could be done scratch As there are no samples of DNA from those who have passed from years ago, how can they check it??? Another question, wouldn't they only be able to check it to others that have contributed DNA? scratch Unless every one's DNA is in some bank somewhere, then they really don't need it, because they already have it. I just don't get it. scratch I think it would wind up inconclusive too often. Suspect Just my 2 cents. drunken

    That's exactly right Nightmoves, they can't trace it back to an exact ancestor and it's a trap in many cases. There are certain organizations trying to track down descendants of certain blood lines and this is how they bait them. They can only tell someone what part of the world their ancestors came from, which most of them know already.

    Agreed Polly, just another SCAM.

    Kelli Marie

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    Scams

    Post  Kelli Marie on Wed 24 Feb 2010, 11:02 pm

    I paid a lot of money once to have a family tree book done. Boy was that a joke. It was based on your last name. Ours came back page after page, inconclusive, no information found, etc. etc. What a waste of money it was.

    I would be hesitant to do it with DNA. I basically know where my ancestors are from and that is good enough for me. I don't need to know if I'm related to the queen queen or King king or even to Tut farao . I guess being related to Santa Claus would be nice santa . Finally I got to use these smileys. cheers

    lol![/quote]

    I hear ya. Those "follow the surname" things are really a scam, about as worthless as letters of credit drawn on non-existent Nigerian banks.

    The labs I've heard about are legitimate. Cross check with Cyndi's list and Ancestry and I think you'll be safe. I'll see if I can find the name of the lab my Bozeman cousins have been using.
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    Grits

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    Re: Genealogy - Would you submit DNA to trace your roots?

    Post  Grits on Wed 24 Feb 2010, 11:48 pm

    Thanks to everyone for the input! Very Happy

    Here is a link to the FAQ page which discusses privacy and costs:

    http://www.worldfamilies.net/faq

    hich yDNA test should I order?

    o If you are trying to match to a different surname without a paper trail - I always recommend 37 markers as a minimum. 67 will be better if the persons you are matching are also tested at 67.

    o If you know the surname you should match, you can probably “get by” with 25 markers, but many folks want (and sometimes need) 37 or 67 to get the clearer insight.

    o If you are only interested in your "deep ancestry" (haplotype) or in proving that you don't share a common ancestor with a specific family, 12 markers are adequate.

    o The only time we see 12 markers being sufficient as a positive match is when the paper trail connection is solid.

    o I also tell folks that if they are serious about their genealogy - that they will end up with at least 37 markers – and very probably wind up at 67.

    You can go in steps, upgrading a bit at a time - or buy the markers all at once (which saves you waiting time – and a few $$ on 37or 67 markers). Prices:

    12 markers $99
    25 markers $148
    37 markers $189
    67 markers $269

    There is a $2 s/h charge for domestic orders and a $4 charge for international orders. Upgrades (using the original samples) from one test level to the next are $49. (37 to 67 is a two step increase and is $99)

    Persons testing yDNA for Surname research at Family Tree DNA (FTDNA) should test through a project, as the cost is $50 to $80 less than testing as an individual. Ordering through the project automatically makes you a member of the project.

    Also, after reading up on it, looks like I would get best results looking for my maternal lineage (but that's okay because extensive research has already been done on my paternal side).

    Like Kelli Marie, I am open to this but won't have spare cash for quite a while, so "if" I ever do it, I'll report on the experience...and "if" Big Brother Twisted Evil wants our DNA, they will get it one way or another, so it's almost pointless to keep it from happening.

    I have some basic links for those seeking Native American ancestors. Posting them and hoping y'all have better luck with them than I have had.

    http://www.nativeweb.org/resources/genealogy_tracing_roots_/american_indian_and_first_nations_genealogy/

    http://www.archives.gov/research/arc/native-americans-final-rolls.html

    http://echotacherokeetribe.homestead.com/Rolls.html

    http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/seresearch/index.htm

    The closest proof I have of my Indian heritage is this quote in some family papers:

    Exie M ****** "Tiny?" was born 21 May 1876. She died 11 Feb 1951.
    BIOGRAPHY: Ma ****** did not know her true age. The family gave her a birthday of 5/21/1876. Her father was a full-blooded Indian.

    BIOGRAPHY: Married on 3/16/1872

    I have yet to find independent verification of this, so... Question

    Good luck genealogy hunting gang! I bet some of us are related! tongue
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    Nightmoves

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    Re: Genealogy - Would you submit DNA to trace your roots?

    Post  Nightmoves on Wed 24 Feb 2010, 11:54 pm

    Well Grits, I can tell you for sure, if you want to go way, way back in time, we are all related. I love you

    lol!
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    Bill Silver Eagle

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    Interesting about geneology

    Post  Bill Silver Eagle on Thu 25 Feb 2010, 12:00 am

    In doing my wife's geneology with some branches of her family tree well back into the 1500's in England ... I think Ancestry.com has where you can find famous people in your tree .... I was astounded by those in my wife's

    Wild Bill Hitchcock
    Oliver Winchester
    Laura Ingals

    the one I tease her about is being a seventh cousin of Bush ....

    When you're able to go back so many years ... its easy to find fifth and sixth cousins who were/are famous
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    Grits

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    Re: Genealogy - Would you submit DNA to trace your roots?

    Post  Grits on Thu 25 Feb 2010, 12:02 am

    Well Grits, I can tell you for sure, if you want to go way, way back in time, we are all related.

    Oh, yeah, that is so true! sunny

    I had printed out the Milesian Legends and genealogy and read it at my break at work today and it is so funny how everything was counted in years from "the flood" or from then "the Pharoah drowned"...and it was stated as "fact" without any doubt. Yeah, one day we'll all have the answers... flower
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    Nightmoves

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    Re: Genealogy - Would you submit DNA to trace your roots?

    Post  Nightmoves on Thu 25 Feb 2010, 12:18 am

    Grits wrote:
    Well Grits, I can tell you for sure, if you want to go way, way back in time, we are all related.

    Oh, yeah, that is so true! sunny

    I had printed out the Milesian Legends and genealogy and read it at my break at work today and it is so funny how everything was counted in years from "the flood" or from then "the Pharoah drowned"...and it was stated as "fact" without any doubt. Yeah, one day we'll all have the answers... flower

    I remember having to do this research when my daughter was young and was really glad we had it for my grandson who had to do it in the 1st grade. It was a requirement and was their big report for the year. We had a lot of fun putting it all together and he was so proud of his Australian side of the family. He is such a little melting pot, but he picked up on that because he loved the "Crocodile Hunter". It is nice to know the many different cultures we all originated from. Glad you are enjoying it as well.
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    Polly, AZ

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    Genealogy - Grit

    Post  Polly, AZ on Thu 25 Feb 2010, 12:21 am

    Grits wrote:
    Well Grits, I can tell you for sure, if you want to go way, way back in time, we are all related.

    Oh, yeah, that is so true! sunny

    I had printed out the Milesian Legends and genealogy and read it at my break at work today and it is so funny how everything was counted in years from "the flood" or from then "the Pharoah drowned"...and it was stated as "fact" without any doubt. Yeah, one day we'll all have the answers... flower

    And if there is such a thing as "reincarnation" we might be searching for "oursleves" as our Great Great Grandfather! Laughing
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    Nightmoves

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    Re: Genealogy - Would you submit DNA to trace your roots?

    Post  Nightmoves on Thu 25 Feb 2010, 12:25 am

    Polly, AZ wrote:
    Grits wrote:
    Well Grits, I can tell you for sure, if you want to go way, way back in time, we are all related.

    Oh, yeah, that is so true! sunny

    I had printed out the Milesian Legends and genealogy and read it at my break at work today and it is so funny how everything was counted in years from "the flood" or from then "the Pharoah drowned"...and it was stated as "fact" without any doubt. Yeah, one day we'll all have the answers... flower

    And if there is such a thing as "reincarnation" we might be searching for "oursleves" as our Great Great Grandfather! Laughing

    Well then we should know it all already right????? Bin there, done that.

    lol! lol! lol! lol! lol! lol!
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    Paula/ swNM

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    Re: Genealogy - Would you submit DNA to trace your roots?

    Post  Paula/ swNM on Thu 25 Feb 2010, 5:00 am

    Bill Silver Eagle wrote:That's a good question ... from various sources I've researched the cost is anywhere from about #364.00 to well over $1,000.00.

    The problem I've come across with geneology research, is the record keeping and spelling of the early census takers. I've been able to only take my father's side of the family back to my grandfather and great-grandmother, because they immigrated around the turn of the 1900's. My mother's side I've been able to go back to the 1830's before records disappear, as well as that it was my 3rd great-grandmother on my maternal grandmother's father's side of the family that were Indian. In the 1830's in the Indiana, Ohio and Michigan areas many of the indigenous peoples intermarried with the westward encroaching whites. So they became "white" or "mulatto" during those censuses. Not to mention in many states it was illegal up until the 1950's for an Indian to own land.

    So is it worth it for me ... maybe if there can be quanitifiable proof of blood lines, but were taking almost five generations of intermixing of genes and DNA.

    I have been lucky to trace portions of my wife's tree back 15 generations to her 11th great grandmother in England in the mid 1500's.

    Hi Bill-
    Long before the days of the internet when tracing ones ancestors was even more of a challenge, my sister decided to look into our dad's family in Indiana. They have lived in what is now Allen County for generations. She traced the German branch to 2 brothers who immigrated in 1778. They moved into what was then the Ohio/Indiana Territory. There were sketchy accounts and recorded marriages to a Mary and an Elizabeth. Neither woman was recorded as having a surname. Mary was my great-great grandmother. I did not think much about it at the time and neither did my sister given how little information was recorded in those days.

    It was not until I met a native woman up in Silver City a few ago who helped other native people trace their roots. We were discussing beading, and I said I loved Native American art and practiced both beading and felt work- I told her I sometimes felt compelled to do it! She laughed and said I must have some native blood. I said as far as I knew I was an Anglo (New Mexican for white person), but my attraction to Native American things was life long going back as far as I can remember.

    One of the things she told me was often the native ancestory was hidden to prevent discrimination and it was often hard to trace because of that. I told her I was born in Indiana and was half Irish and the other half was German as far as we knew. I told her about my sister's early geneology research and the women with no surnames. "Well, there it is." she said. Often native women would marry white settlers and if they converted to Christianity and took a Christian name they would be married in the local church and become part of the settlers community. She said I was probably Shawnee. I still get chills when I think about this! She said something I will always remember "No matter how thin that blood seems to you, it will always call to you- always." I sure did explain a lot of things for which I had no explanation.

    So if some of your early family records show those ancestresses with no surname, that may be a good guide to Native roots. I do believe these ancestors want to be found. Good luck with your search.
    Blessings- Paula.
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    Bill Silver Eagle

    Posts : 70
    Join date : 2010-02-19

    Hi Paula

    Post  Bill Silver Eagle on Thu 25 Feb 2010, 3:27 pm

    re: Long before the days of the internet when tracing ones ancestors was even more of a challenge, my sister decided to look into our dad's family in Indiana. They have lived in what is now Allen County for generations. She traced the German branch to 2 brothers who immigrated in 1778. They moved into what was then the Ohio/Indiana Territory. There were sketchy accounts and recorded marriages to a Mary and an Elizabeth. Neither woman was recorded as having a surname. Mary was my great-great grandmother. I did not think much about it at the time and neither did my sister given how little information was recorded in those days.

    Allen County in Ohio?

    Then where in Indiana? Kosciusko County? Van Buren Township?

    My maternal grandmother's mother was of the Speicher Family, German/Pennsylvania Dutch. The great-great grandfather in that line was a Speicher also recorded as Spiker in Census records in Allen County, Ohio. The "Indian lineage" I believe comes from my grandmother's father and the Ecker line of the family, or both 3rd great grandmothers in that line. One I believe to have been Shawnee and the other to have been Miami.

    regarding lack of surnames in trees or records when doing searches, I've come to the same conclusion when a record of a tree just abruptly stops. Besides having GWB and Papa Bush as 6th and 7th cousins, my wife has other notables like LBJ, Walt Disney, George Washington Carver, a few first ladies, in various levels of cousins relationships.
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    Lar

    Posts : 17
    Join date : 2010-02-21
    Age : 59
    Location : Ontario Canada

    Re: Genealogy - Would you submit DNA to trace your roots?

    Post  Lar on Thu 25 Feb 2010, 4:34 pm

    yes I too think the "dead ends" in the family trees point to family protecting the "half blood" children from bigotry and alienation, that was rampant (sp) at the time and even to this day; unfortunately.
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    Bill Silver Eagle

    Posts : 70
    Join date : 2010-02-19

    Just curious ... how many generations can you go back?

    Post  Bill Silver Eagle on Thu 25 Feb 2010, 5:56 pm

    In about three years of work I've been able to take my wife's line back

    on maternal grandfather's lineage back to 1590 in Warwickshire England - 12th Great Grandfather;

    and on maternal grandmother's lineage back to 1541 in Charfield, Gloucestershire, England - 12th Great Grandfather

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    Re: Genealogy - Would you submit DNA to trace your roots?

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