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    HERBAL MEDICINE

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    Moggy

    Posts : 26
    Join date : 2010-03-07
    Location : NE Georgia Mtns

    HERBAL MEDICINE

    Post  Moggy on Tue 09 Mar 2010, 5:41 pm

    HERBAL FORMULAS INTRO
    by Moggy

    Surviving in a world that is in a state of upheaval means knowing how to heal yourself when physical problems arise...or better yet, how to prevent problems from arising in the first place. Any of the states in the Appalachian Mountain Range have a wealth of natural remedies growing in the forests that comprise this range, especially Georgia (Sosebee Cove in the Chattahoochee Nat’l Forest is a botanist’s dream come true) and North Carolina, as the Cherokee Indians have left behind what may be considered an encyclopedia of healing remedies.

    To begin, let us explore Stinging Nettle (Urtica dioica). It is a nutritive..kidney ally..alterative, antiseptic, anti-diabetic, anti-rheumatic. Natural remedy for the pain of osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, tendinitis and bursitis..preventative of prostate problems.

    Stinging Nettle is a wonder herb of nourishment and powerful enough to heal damaged tissue. Kidneys, lungs, intestines, and arteries are tonified, strengthened and gradually altered toward optimum functioning. The chemical constituents are mucilage, iron phosphate, potassium phosphate, magnesium phosphate and potassium chloride..and in the fresh plant, formic acid. The chemistry of this plant makes it extremely valuable as a therapeutic agent in inflammatory and catarrhal conditions. Organic iron phosphate is nature’s quickest and best remedy for all inflammation; potassium phosphate is the basic food for brain and nerves; and potassium chloride is nature’s masterpiece solvent of fibrin.

    The anti-inflammatory substances join with the rich concentration of the minerals boron and silicon to help ease pain of the above diseases. The fresh leaves can be used raw and applied directly to the rheumatic pain area as they increase circulation and draw out pain.

    For the purposes of men’s sexual health, the key ingredients are the sterols that lessen the action of DHT, the form of testosterone that causes the prostate to enlarge.

    A cup or more of nettle tea taken daily relieves and helps prevent water retention.

    HERBAL TEA:
    Use two teaspoons of dried nettle leaves per pint of boiling water.

    MEDICINAL TEA:
    Use three to four teaspoons per pint of boiling water.

    HERBAL INFUSION (for energy):
    One ounce of dried nettle herb
    One quart of filtered water
    Place the herb into a quart jar and fill to the top with boiling water. Stir with a wooden spoon and add enough water to fill the jar to the top. Cover tightly and set aside to brew for at least four hours or overnight.

    To use: Strain and squeeze the liquid out of the herb. Be sure to refrigerate your infusion, as it will go bad at room temperature once it is done brewing. Drink within 24 hours.

    AS A VEGETABLE SIDE:
    I steam a few handfuls of freshly picked Stinging Nettle (use gloves to prevent being stung) for about 15 minutes and top with a wee bit of butter.

    IDENTIFICATION:
    http://www.wildmanstevebrill.com/Plants.Folder/Nettle.html
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    Balance

    Posts : 34
    Join date : 2010-02-18
    Location : The Southern Part of The Once Golden State.

    Herbs

    Post  Balance on Tue 09 Mar 2010, 7:42 pm

    Moggy, Thanks for the wonderful holistic information. Looking forward to more of your "Magic". Blessings flower
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    Whisper

    Posts : 22
    Join date : 2010-02-22
    Location : Texas

    Re: HERBAL MEDICINE

    Post  Whisper on Tue 09 Mar 2010, 10:57 pm

    Moggy,

    Thanks so much for starting this thread I love learning more about herbal remedies.

    I'm in the midst of a horrible sinus infection that required several highly potent drugs from the doctor. This happens to me every Spring when the weather in Texas can change in one day. Pollen is thru the roof this year with all the rain we've had.

    Do you have any suggestions for keeping the sinuses healthy?

    Thanks in advance?

    Whisper
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    Moggy

    Posts : 26
    Join date : 2010-03-07
    Location : NE Georgia Mtns

    Re: HERBAL MEDICINE

    Post  Moggy on Tue 09 Mar 2010, 11:28 pm

    Aye, Whisper, I have helped a few people recover from sinus infections by using Eucalyptus Essential Oil. If you aren't familiar with essential oils I would be glad to teach you about them. Many of the products on the market are diluted..to obtain medicinal value it is important to purchase from a reputable dealer. I use the following company, am not a rep or have any connection with them other than as a customer:

    www.Libertynatural.com

    This is the one you want: http://libertynatural.com/bulk/460.htm

    How to use:
    1) Bring water to a near boil, pour into a bowl, add three drops Eucalyptus EO, put a towel over both your head and the bowl and breathe in the vapors.

    2) At bedtime do this: put 2 or 3 drops of Eucalyptus EO into a small amount of olive oil and massage into the bottoms of your feet. The medicinal attributes will flood your bloodstream in approximately 20 seconds and help heal you over the course of the night. You may have to do this for a few nights, depending on your condition.

    3) From time to time throughout the day, put the bottle up to your nostrils and take a slow, deep breath.

    Moggy
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    Whisper

    Posts : 22
    Join date : 2010-02-22
    Location : Texas

    Re: HERBAL MEDICINE

    Post  Whisper on Wed 10 Mar 2010, 5:54 pm

    Thanks Moggy for that information. I've used essential oils to make my home-made soaps but I'll order from Liberty Natural. I have used eucalyptus oil to sniff when I was stuffed up but not on the bottom of my feet. I'll give it a try.


    I hope that as you have time you will share your knowledge here.

    Thanks again.

    Whisper.
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    lennie

    Posts : 1
    Join date : 2010-03-10

    Re: HERBAL MEDICINE

    Post  lennie on Thu 11 Mar 2010, 8:14 am

    Hi Moggy,
    I pulled up a weed to realize as it stung me that it was probably stinging nettle. Now that I've read your post and checked out the ID info, I wish I had saved it. I'll be on the lookout for more. What happens to the sting when you cook & eat fresh ones?
    Thanks for your post...
    Lennie
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    Moggy

    Posts : 26
    Join date : 2010-03-07
    Location : NE Georgia Mtns

    Re: HERBAL MEDICINE

    Post  Moggy on Thu 11 Mar 2010, 11:59 am

    Hi Lennie..the sting is neutralized when the herb is steamed. If you are unable to locate any more of the wild nettle, The Thyme Garden sells seed:

    http://www.storesonline.com/site/561124/product/S1895

    Moggy
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    Paula/ swNM

    Posts : 54
    Join date : 2010-02-17

    Re: HERBAL MEDICINE

    Post  Paula/ swNM on Fri 12 Mar 2010, 4:02 am

    Hi Moggy, Linnie and Whisper-
    Medicinal herbs are one of my favorite topics. I have been involved with the world of herbs for a long time now. Before we moved down to the southwestern deserts we lived in northern Minnesota. Stinging nettle was a common wild plant and I had a bad reaction to its sting. To alleviate the sting of nettle rub the area with the fresh leaf of Jewel Weed (Impateins biflora). Interesting note that Jewel Weed frequently grows in the same habitat as the nettle. In MN both plants grew in moist, partial shaded places. The jewel weed is an annual that grows 2 to 3 feet tall. The stems are watery and the smooth leaves are oval and coarsly toothed. The showy flowers are bright orange and sometimes dotted with red or brown, and they have a forward pointing spur that makes them quite distinctive. They are a member of the Impatiens family and resemble the domestic impatiens in many ways. Other common names are wild impatien or touch-me-not. I do not know the full habitat range of the Jewel weed, but it may also grow in the east and mid-west. I do know that Jewel Weed stopped "nettle burn" almost instantly. If it does not grow in your area you might be able to get seeds from one of the native plant nurseries, but it will need a moist environment to do well. Interesting discussion, Thank you for starting it.
    Blessings- Paula.
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    Conch23

    Posts : 155
    Join date : 2010-02-18
    Location : Lake La

    Wonderful info here thanks for the input~Recently came down with a cold my god have not had one in years.

    Post  Conch23 on Fri 12 Mar 2010, 4:55 am

    Paula/ swNM wrote:Hi Moggy, Linnie and Whisper-
    Medicinal herbs are one of my favorite topics. I have been involved with the world of herbs for a long time now. Before we moved down to the southwestern deserts we lived in northern Minnesota. Stinging nettle was a common wild plant and I had a bad reaction to its sting. To alleviate the sting of nettle rub the area with the fresh leaf of Jewel Weed (Impateins biflora). Interesting note that Jewel Weed frequently grows in the same habitat as the nettle. In MN both plants grew in moist, partial shaded places. The jewel weed is an annual that grows 2 to 3 feet tall. The stems are watery and the smooth leaves are oval and coarsly toothed. The showy flowers are bright orange and sometimes dotted with red or brown, and they have a forward pointing spur that makes them quite distinctive. They are a member of the Impatiens family and resemble the domestic impatiens in many ways. Other common names are wild impatien or touch-me-not. I do not know the full habitat range of the Jewel weed, but it may also grow in the east and mid-west. I do know that Jewel Weed stopped "nettle burn" almost instantly. If it does not grow in your area you might be able to get seeds from one of the native plant nurseries, but it will need a moist environment to do well. Interesting discussion, Thank you for starting it.
    Blessings- Paula.

    After trying my usual zicam and zinc and chamomile tea~ I tried something different as this felt not quite like a cold? anyhow used some oil of oregano P73 formula and wow I felt a difference in 20 mins. Congestion was knocked in half. Anyone ever use this.? OK well spring time is right around the corner bounce and I am so excited to get out in the garden.
    Love & light to all Sara bounce
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    Moggy

    Posts : 26
    Join date : 2010-03-07
    Location : NE Georgia Mtns

    Mullein (Verbascum thapsus)

    Post  Moggy on Sun 14 Mar 2010, 3:25 pm

    HERBAL FORMULAS #2

    Mullein (Verbascum thapsus) is found growing along roadways and in meadows. It is a biennial, producing leaves the first year and fruiting and dying the second year. Easy to raise as once planted it will scatter its seeds and multiply itself. Mullein leaves and flowers are used as analgesic, antihistamine, antioxidant, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, diuretic and sedative. In some cases the roots are also used.

    American Indians used to relieve lung congestion by smoking dried leaves of the herb Mullein although I wouldn’t recommend doing so due to threat of an allergic reaction. They also used Mullein as a treatment for hemorrhoids and gout.

    Mullein is a beneficial remedy for toning mucous membranes and reducing inflammation; in the case of the respiratory system it facilitates expectoration; in the case of hemorrhoids it eases the discomfort. In both situations it reduces inflammation.

    There are so many ways to use this healing herb. To clear the lungs from congestion, boil about a cup of the leaves in a quart of water, pour into a bowl and make a tent by leaning over the bowl and covering your head and the bowl with a towel. Take shallow breaths at first and then inhale the steam deeper; do this for five or ten minutes.
    For both people and pets you can easily make an herbal oil for earache or for the animal problem of ear mites by soaking about a teaspoon of Mullein leaves in two tablespoons of warm olive oil. When the leaves have absorbed all the oil add a clove of chopped garlic, mix well, and strain through a fine clean cloth. Using a dropper, squeeze a few drops into the ear. It will soothe and heal.

    MULLEIN INFUSION

    NATURAL REMEDY FOR PULMONARY COMPLAINTS
    A remedy for checking distressing cough and expectoration in all pulmonary diseases. Also for hemorrhage of the lungs, stomach, intestines, or any other internal part. It is considered to have more curative value in tuberculosis, coughs, and bronchitis than comfrey,lungwort, pleurisy root, or any other herb used in the treatment of respiratory diseases. Formula by Shook.

    1 ounce mullein leaves (cut)
    1 ½ pints distilled water

    Boil the water and pour over the leaves. Cover and let steep in a hot place for 15 minutes. Strain through muslin to avoid the hairs. Sweeten with honey to taste, or add one ounce of food grade vegetable glycerine. Cool, bottle, and keep in a cool place.

    DOSE: Three to four ounces or more 3 or 4 times a day between meals. Children less according to age.

    MULLEIN COUGH DROPS...recipe by Karyn Siegel-Maier
    ½ cup mullein leaves, packed
    1 cup boiling water
    1 1/3 cup brown sugar

    Steep the leaves in the boiled water, covered, for one hour. Strain. Add brown sugar. Boil until the mixture reaches the soft candy stage, then pour onto a greased cookie sheet. With a butter knife, score out squares while the mixture is still soft. Allow to cool completely, then break into individual squares. Wrap each drop in waxed paper.

    Do not use this herb if pregnant or breast feeding.
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    Dude_in_CA

    Posts : 53
    Join date : 2010-02-19
    Location : NorCal

    Re: HERBAL MEDICINE

    Post  Dude_in_CA on Sun 14 Mar 2010, 6:06 pm

    Nice to see you on this forum Moggy. Very Happy
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    Conch23

    Posts : 155
    Join date : 2010-02-18
    Location : Lake La

    Thanks for the info.. Think I ve pulled that out in the yard. Pretty flowers. Blessings

    Post  Conch23 on Sun 14 Mar 2010, 7:29 pm

    Moggy wrote:HERBAL FORMULAS #2

    Mullein (Verbascum thapsus) is found growing along roadways and in meadows. It is a biennial, producing leaves the first year and fruiting and dying the second year. Easy to raise as once planted it will scatter its seeds and multiply itself. Mullein leaves and flowers are used as analgesic, antihistamine, antioxidant, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, diuretic and sedative. In some cases the roots are also used.

    American Indians used to relieve lung congestion by smoking dried leaves of the herb Mullein although I wouldn’t recommend doing so due to threat of an allergic reaction. They also used Mullein as a treatment for hemorrhoids and gout.

    Mullein is a beneficial remedy for toning mucous membranes and reducing inflammation; in the case of the respiratory system it facilitates expectoration; in the case of hemorrhoids it eases the discomfort. In both situations it reduces inflammation.

    There are so many ways to use this healing herb. To clear the lungs from congestion, boil about a cup of the leaves in a quart of water, pour into a bowl and make a tent by leaning over the bowl and covering your head and the bowl with a towel. Take shallow breaths at first and then inhale the steam deeper; do this for five or ten minutes.
    For both people and pets you can easily make an herbal oil for earache or for the animal problem of ear mites by soaking about a teaspoon of Mullein leaves in two tablespoons of warm olive oil. When the leaves have absorbed all the oil add a clove of chopped garlic, mix well, and strain through a fine clean cloth. Using a dropper, squeeze a few drops into the ear. It will soothe and heal.

    MULLEIN INFUSION

    NATURAL REMEDY FOR PULMONARY COMPLAINTS
    A remedy for checking distressing cough and expectoration in all pulmonary diseases. Also for hemorrhage of the lungs, stomach, intestines, or any other internal part. It is considered to have more curative value in tuberculosis, coughs, and bronchitis than comfrey,lungwort, pleurisy root, or any other herb used in the treatment of respiratory diseases. Formula by Shook.

    1 ounce mullein leaves (cut)
    1 ½ pints distilled water

    Boil the water and pour over the leaves. Cover and let steep in a hot place for 15 minutes. Strain through muslin to avoid the hairs. Sweeten with honey to taste, or add one ounce of food grade vegetable glycerine. Cool, bottle, and keep in a cool place.

    DOSE: Three to four ounces or more 3 or 4 times a day between meals. Children less according to age.

    MULLEIN COUGH DROPS...recipe by Karyn Siegel-Maier
    ½ cup mullein leaves, packed
    1 cup boiling water
    1 1/3 cup brown sugar

    Steep the leaves in the boiled water, covered, for one hour. Strain. Add brown sugar. Boil until the mixture reaches the soft candy stage, then pour onto a greased cookie sheet. With a butter knife, score out squares while the mixture is still soft. Allow to cool completely, then break into individual squares. Wrap each drop in waxed paper.

    Do not use this herb if pregnant or breast feeding.
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    LaLuna

    Posts : 84
    Join date : 2010-02-22
    Age : 66

    Osha -- Bear Medicine

    Post  LaLuna on Sat 27 Mar 2010, 10:33 pm

    I've been interested in herbal remedies for some time, too. One of my favorites is Osha... If for no other reason than the smell alone! It may not be for everyone, but it has a wonderful earthy smell that reminds me of being in a damp redwood forest. It's good for coughs, sore throats and bronchial infections, but has other uses too.

    A great book with information about Osha and some other good herbal remedies is "Sacred Plant Medicine", by Stephen Harrod Buhner.

    Carole flower

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